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Grades 9 10

Global Studies

World Geography/World History

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/ Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

 

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

10.1 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the developments in the history of the world from its beginnings through the period of intensified hemispheric interactions (circa 1500). The student should be able to

10.1.1 Describe the ways in which the biological and cultural processes gave rise to the earliest human communities in the Neolithic Age.

10.1.2 Identify the processes that led to the emergence of agricultural societies throughout the world prior to 4000 BC.

10.1.3 Analyze the major characteristics of civilization and how civilizations emerged in Mesopotamia, the Nile River Valley, the Indus Valley and the Huang Valley from 4000 to 1000 BC.

10.1.4 Explain how agrarian societies spread and new states emerged from 3000-1000 BC.

10.3 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of government, its origins and functions, including civic life, politics and government. The student should be able to

10.3.1 Examine the necessity and purposes of government.

10.3.2 Compare and contrast the civic life, politics and forms of government in major civilizations.

10.3.3 Analyze the political interactions, including conflicts, among major nations and empires.

10.3.4 Trace the causes and consequences of major governmental changes within selected nations and empires.

10.3.5 Examine and illustrate how governmental decisions are influenced by physical and cultural geography

10.4 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the world in spatial terms. The student should be able to

10.4.1 Use maps and other graphic representations to depict geographic problems.

10.4.2 Use technologies to represent and interpret Earth's physical and human systems.

10.4.3 Use geographic representations and tools to analyze, explain and solve geographic problems.

10.4.4 Answer complex geographic questions using maps of physical and human features of the world.

10.4.5 Describe how maps reflect the human perception of places.

10.4.6 Explain how information on maps influences spatial and environmental decision-making.

10.4.7 Account for patterns of human movement on Earth.

10.4.8 Analyze relationships in and between places using geographic models.

10.4.9 Explain how people perceive and use space.

10.4.10 Make decisions using geographic concepts and models.

 

10.10 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of how scarcity, choice, and the principles of trade impact economic activity The student should be able to

10.10.1 Illustrate how scarcity and choice impact the economic decisions of communities, nations or empires.

10.10.2 Trace the increasing complexity of monetary systems.

10.10.3 Assess how the division of labor, specialization, and increase of technology have impacted productivity and trade.

10.10.4 Examine and provide examples of economic decision making based upon geographic factors.

 


Grades 9 10

Global Studies

World Geography/World History

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/ Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

 

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

10.1.5 Identify and interpret how the major political, social, cultural trends and technological innovations differed in Africa, Europe, Asia and the Americas from 2000 to 1000 BC.

10.1.6 Describe the emergence of Aegean civilizations and their relationship to the peoples of the eastern Mediterranean and Southwest Asia from 600-200 BC.

10.1.7 Analyze the development of religions and large-scale empires in the Mediterranean world, China, Southwest Asia and India from 500 BC to 300 AD.

10.1.8 Describe the development of early agrarian civilizations in Mesoamerica in the millennium AD.

10.1.9 Interpret common themes among the classical traditions, religions and giant empires in Africa, Asia, Europe and Mesoamerica from 300-1000 AD.

10.1.10 Analyze the search for political, social and cultural redefinition in Europe from 500 to 1000 AD.

10.1.11 Trace the development of agricultural societies and new states in Africa and Oceania prior to 1000 AD.

 

10.5 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of places and regions. The student should be able to

10.5.1 Explain the meaning and significance of place.

10.5.2 Analyze the changing physical and human characteristics of places.

10.5.3 Explain how relationships between humans and the physical environment lead to the formation of places and to a sense of personal and community identity.

10.5.4 Assess how multiple criteria can be used to define a region.

10.5.5 Describe the structure of regional systems.

10.5.6 Examine the ways in which physical and human regional systems are interconnected.

10.5.7 Analyze geographic issues using regions.

10.5.8 Describe the ways places and regions serve as symbols for individuals and society.

10.5.9 Describe the ways different groups of people within a society view places and regions.

10.5.10 Evaluate how cultural changes affect perceptions of places and regions.

 

 

Grades 9 10

Global Studies

World Geography/World History

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/ Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

 

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

10.1.12      Explain causes and consequences of the rise of Islamic civilization through 1200 AD.

10.1.13      Examine the transformation of European society and culture from 1000-1400 AD, including the origins of the Italian Renaissance.

10.1.14      Trace the rise of the Mongol empire and its consequences for Eurasian peoples from 1200-1350 AD.

10.2 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the major developments in the history of the world during the modern era circa 1500 to present. The student should be able to

10.2.1 Analyze the global transformations that resulted from the transoceanic interlinking of all major regions of the world from 1450-1600.

10.2.2 Describe the political, economic and cultural transformations of European society in an age of global intercommunication, 1450-1600.

10.2.3 Interpret the common trends of the emergence of the first global age, 1450-1770.

 

 

10.6 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of physical systems on Earth. The student should be able to

10.6.1 Compare the dynamics of the four basic components of the Earth's physical systems: the atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere.

10.6.2 Explain the interaction of Earth's physical systems.

10.6.3 Describe the ways in which Earth's physical processes are dynamic and interactive.

10.6.4 Explain the distribution and characteristics of ecosystems.

10.6.5 Analyze the biodiversity and productivity of ecosystems.

10.6.6 Examine the importance of ecosystems in people's understanding of environmental issues.

 

10.7 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the role of human systems on earth. The student should be able to

10.7.1 Recognize the reasons for trends in numbers and patterns in the world population.

10.7.2 Describe the impact on physical and human systems of human migration.

10.7.3 Analyze how culture influences ways of life.

 

 

 

Grades 9 10

Global Studies

World Geography/World History

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/ Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

 

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

10.2.4 Compare and contrast the large territorial empires that dominated much of the world between 1500-1800.

10.2.5 Analyze the economic, political and cultural interrelations, including conflicts, among peoples of Africa, Europe and the Americas, 1500-1750.

10.2.6 Explain transformations in Asian societies in the era of European expansion.

10.2.7 Analyze the causes and consequences of political revolutions between 1650-1850.

10.2.8 Analyze the causes and consequences of the agricultural and industrial revolutions, 1700-1850.

10.2.9 Describe the transformation of Eurasian and Oceanic societies in an era of global trade and rising European power, 1750-1870.

10.2.10 Interpret common themes in the Age of Revolutions, 1650-1914.

10.2.11 Delineate patterns of global change in the era of Western military and economic domination, 1800 - 1914.

10.2.12 Delineate patterns of nationalism, state/nation building and social reform in Europe and the Americas, 1830-1914.

 

10.7.4 Describe how transportation and communications technology contribute to cultural convergence and divergence.

10.7.5 Compare and contrast the major economic systems on Earth.

10.7.6 Explain why areas of various sizes function as economic activity centers.

10.7.7 Describe the economic interdependence of the world's countries.

10.7.8 Explain the spatial arrangement of urban areas as well as their sizes and functions.

10.7.9 Compare settlement patterns in undeveloped and developing countries.

10.7.10 Describe the processes that change the internal structures of urban areas.

10.7.11 Explain the ever-changing urban area.

10.7.12 Analyze the effect of conflict and cooperation and how they influence the development and control of Earth's social, political and economic entities.

10.7.13 Examine how people's lives are affected by the social, political and economic identities on Earth.

10.7.14 Describe how self-interest and different points of view can be factors in conflict over resources and territory.

 

Grades 9 10

Global Studies

World Geography/World History

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/ Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

 

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

10.2.13 Describe reform, revolution and social change in the world economy from 1900 to 1939.

10.2.14 Analyze the consequences of the rise of totalitarian states.

10.2.15 Analyze the causes, course and global consequences of World Wars I and II.

10.2.16 Analyze the conflict between diverse socioeconomic systems and perspectives.

10.2.17 Describe the break up of European colonial empires and the development of new nations in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean.

10.2.18 Analyze oppression of groups and the struggle for human rights across the world.

10.2.19 Describe the effort to attain stability, peace and a sense of community in an interdependent world.

10.2.20 Interpret major global trends since World War II.

10.2.21      Describe the origins, causes and results of the Cold War in the aftermath of World War II.

10.2.22      Explain the adjustment and the challenges in the post-Cold War era.

 

10.8 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of interactions between the environment and society. The student should be able to

10.8.1 Evaluate ways in which technology has expanded the human capability to modify the physical environment.

10.8.2 Examine the global impacts of human changes in the physical environment.

10.8.3 Explain how to apply appropriate models and information to understand environmental problems.

10.8.4 Describe how changes in the physical environment can diminish its capacity to support human activity.

10.8.5 Develop strategies to respond to constraints placed on human systems by the physical environment.

10.8.6 Analyze how humans perceive and react to natural hazards.

10.8.7 Explain how the spatial distribution of resource affects patterns of human settlement.

10.8.8 Describe how the development and use of resources change over time.

10.8.9 Evaluate policy decisions regarding the use of resources in different regions of the world.

 

 

Grades 9 10

Global Studies

World Geography/World History

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/ Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

 

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

 

 

10.9 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the uses of geography. The student should be able to

10.9.1 Explain how processes of spatial change have affected history.

10.9.2 Describe how changing perceptions of geographic features have led to changes in human societies.

10.9.3 Analyze ways in which physical and human features have affected events in history.

10.9.4 Assess how different points of view influence the development of policies designed to use and manage Earth's resources.

10.9.5 Analyze a variety of contemporary issues in terms of Earth's physical and human systems.

10.9.6 Explain how to use geographic knowledge, skills and perspectives to analyze problems and make decisions.

 

 

 

 


Grades 11 12

United States and South Carolina Studies Government -- Economics

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

12.1 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the major developments in the United States and South Carolina from the end of Reconstruction through World War II (circa 1945). The student should be able to

12.1.1 Explain how the rise of corporations, heavy industry and mechanized farming transformed the American people in the late 1800's.

12.1.2 Interpret the immigration patterns from 1870 to circa 1945.

12.1.3 Describe how new social patterns, conflicts and ideas of national unity developed amid growing cultural diversity.

12.1.4 Analyze the rise of the American labor movement and how political issues reflected social and economic changes.

12.1.5 Evaluate government policies toward Native Americans and their responses.

 

12.3 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of government, its origins and functions, including civic life, politics and government. The student should be able to

12.3.1 Take and defend positions concerning the necessity and the purposes of government.

12.3.2 Analyze the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited governments.

12.3.3 Compare and contrast the "rule of law" and the "rule of man"-- explain how the rule of law protects individual rights and the common good.

12.3.4 Explain the various purposes that constitutions serve.

12.3.5 Identify alternative uses of the term constitution.

12.3.6 Explain the advantages and disadvantages of confederal, federal and unitary systems of government.

12.3.7 Evaluate, take and defend positions on how well alternative forms of representation serve the purposes of constitutional government.

 

12.4 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the foundations of American democracy, including its basic principles and the foundations of the American political system. The student should be able to

 

12.8 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the United States in spatial terms. The learner should be able to

12.8.1 Design and use maps, globes, graphs, charts and models to illustrate and analyze location and spatial distributions of physical and cultural features of the United States.

12.8.2 Describe geographic patterns and types of migration as the have affected settlement, population change, economic development, natural resources and ecosystems.

12.8.3 Analyze the role of technology development in shaping the characteristics of economic, cultural and political regions.

12.9 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of how scarcity and choice impact economic activity. The student should be able to

12.9.1 Show how scarcity and choice impact the economic decisions of individuals, families and communities.

12.9.2 Describe the typical choices families must make as they budget their income and expenses.

12.9.3 Examine how money, goods and services link households and businesses in the U.S. economy.

12.9.4 Describe how people use psychological and intellectual resources to deal with scarcity.

12.9.5 Explain how states and nations use scarce resources to satisfy human wants.

12.9.6 Analyze how money encourages specialization, promotes markets, helps organize production and distributes goods and services.

12.9.7 Assess how choices may translate into opportunity costs and result in trade-offs that determine what goods and services are provided.

12.9.8 Explain economic decision-making based on marginal benefit and marginal cost for individuals and government.

12.9.9 Explain how consumers spend their budget to maximize the net benefits of their income.

 

 

Grades 11 12

United States and South Carolina Studies Government --Economics

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

12.1.6 Examine the changing role of women in the political and social context.

12.1.7 Analyze the changing role of the United States in world affairs to World War I.

12.1.8 Assess how Progressives and others addressed problems of industrial capitalism, urbanization and political corruption.

12.1.9 Assess the causes, course and effects of World War I.

12.1.10 Examine social tensions and their consequences in the post World War I era.

 

12.4.1 Explain the essential ideas of American Constitutional government as expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers and other historic documents.

12.4.2 Identify opportunities for individuals to volunteer in their own schools and communities.

12.4.3 Explain the conditions that are essential for the growth of a constitutional government.

12.4.4 Explain important factors that have helped shape American democracy, including but not limited to religious freedom, a history of slavery, effects of a frontier and a market economy.

12.4.5 Explain the many forms of diversity in American society and why conflicts have arisen from diversity.

12.4.6 Assess the ways conflicts about diversity can be resolved in a peaceful manner that respects individual rights and promotes the common good.

12.4.7 Describe the character of American political conflict and explain factors that usually prevent violence or that lower its intensity.

12.4.8 Evaluate, take and defend positions on issues in which fundamental values and principles are in conflict, including but not limited to conflicts between liberty and

12.8 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the United States in spatial terms. The learner should be able to

12.8.1 Design and use maps, globes, graphs, charts and models to illustrate and analyze location and spatial distributions of physical and cultural features of the United States.

12.8.2 Describe geographic patterns and types of migration as the have affected settlement, population change, economic development, natural resources and ecosystems.

12.8.3 Analyze the role of technology development in shaping the characteristics of economic, cultural and political regions.

12.9.10 Identify present day choices that have important future consequences.

12.9.11 Describe factors of production.

12.9.12 Describe how specialization and division of labor permit scarce resources to be used more efficiently.

12.9.13 Explain how producers allocate their expenditures to minimize production costs.

12.9.14 Compare and contrast how people make economic decisions in traditional, command, market and mixed market economies.

 

12.10 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of markets and the role of demand and supply in determining price and resource allocation. The student should be able to

12.10.1 Identify conditions that make industries either more or less competitive.

12.10.2 Describe the nature and roles of competition in a market economy.

12.10.3 Explain the law of demand and law of supply.

12.10.4 Identify the non-price determinants of demand and those of supply.

12.10.5 Examine how changes in the non-price determinants of demand cause demand to change.

 

Grades 11 12

United States and South Carolina Studies - Government/Economics

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

12.1.11 Analyze the emergence of a modern capitalist economy in the 1920's.

12.1.12 Assess how new cultural movements reflected and changed American society in the post World War I period.

12.1.13 Describe developments in political and international affairs in the 1920's.

12.1.14 Analyze the causes of the Great Depression and how it affected American society.

12.1.15 Evaluate how the New Deal addressed the Great Depression and transformed American society.

12.1.16 Examine changes in everyday life in response to technological and scientific advancement.

12.1.17 Describe the causes and course of World War II, including the Holocaust, the

equality and conflicts between individual rights and the need to maintain social stability.

12.4.9 Evaluate, take and defend positions on current issues involving constitutional protection of individual rights.

12.4.10      Identify some important American ideals and explain, using historical and contemporary examples, discrepancies between American ideals and the realities of political and social life.

12.4.11 Identify and give examples of ways in which discrepancies between the reality and the ideals of American constitutional democracy can be reduced by individual action, social action and political action.

12.5 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the role of the U.S. Constitution in American democracy, including the ways in which the U.S. government established by the Constitution embodies the purposes, values and principles of American democracy. The student should be able to

12.5.1         Evaluate, take and defend positions on issues regarding the distribution of powers and responsibilities within the federal system.

12.5.2         Examine the relationship between taxation and government.

 

12.10.6 Examine how changes in the non-price determinants of supply cause supply to change.

12.10.7 Analyze how change in market price and quantity result from changes in demand and supply.

12.10.8 Explain economic incentives that lead to the efficient use of resources.

12.10.9 Explain market equilibrium and the mechanism for eliminating shortages and surpluses.

12.10.10 Identify the components of market research and its impact on products.

12.11 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the sources of income and growth in a free enterprise economy. The student should be able to

12.11.1 Illustrate how entrepreneurial decisions are influenced by changes in taxation and government regulation.

12.11.2      Define interest and explain how interest rates and investment are related.

12.11.3      Explain the importance of profits and losses in a free enterprise economy.

12.11.4      1Describe the relationships among technology, productivity and capital.

12.11.5      Explain the relationship of an educated workforce to economic growth and prosperity.

 


Grades 11 12

United States and South Carolina Studies Government -- Economics

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

character of the war at home and abroad and its reshaping of the United States role in world affairs.

12.2 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the major developments in the United States and South Carolina from the end of World War II through the present. The student should be able to

12.2.1 Explain the economic boom and the social and cultural transformations of postwar United States.

12.2.2 Describe how postwar science augmented the nation's economic strength, transformed daily life and influenced the world economy.

12.2.3 Analyze the effects of the postwar extension of the New Deal, the New Frontier, and the Great Society.

 

12.5.3 Explain why states have constitutions, their purposes and the relationship of state constitutions to the federal constitution.

12.5.4 Analyze the organization and major responsibilities of state and local government.

12.5.5 Explain the importance of law in the American constitutional system.

12.5.6 Identify representatives in the legislative branches as well as the heads of the executive branches of their local, state and national governments.

12.5.7 Assess and apply criteria useful in evaluating rules and laws, including but not limited to fairness, protection of individual rights and promotion of the common good.

12.5.8 Define the concept of due process of law and explain the importance to individuals and society.

12.5.9 Explain what is meant by the public agenda and explain how it is set.

12.5.10 Evaluate, take and defend positions on the influence of the media on American political life.

12.5.11      Analyze how political parties, campaigns and elections provide opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process.

12.5.12      Describe the historical and contemporary roles of prominent associations and groups in local, state, or national politics.

 

12.11.6 Analyze how profits affect investment and hence productivity and living standards.

12.11.7 Explain and compare personal income distribution and functional income distribution.

 

12.12 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the various economic institutions vital to a market economy. The student should be able to

12.12.1 Describe examples of the basic institutions of capitalism: private property, free enterprise, competition and the profit motive.

12.12.2 Examine the interaction of banks and business firms to create and expand business enterprise through savings and investments.

12.12.3      Explain positive and negative impacts on market-driven economies when dominated by a strong authoritarian government.

 

12.13 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of government in the operation of markets. The student should be able to

12.13.1   List the commonly accepted economic responsibilities of government in the economy.

12.13.2   Explain why government produces some goods and services.

 

 

Grades 11 12

United States and South Carolina Studies

Government/Economics

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

12.2.4 Describe how the Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced domestic and international politics.

12.2.5 Evaluate the struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil liberties.

12.2.6 Assess developments in domestic politics from 1968 to the present. 12.2.7 Evaluate economic, social and cultural developments in contemporary United States, 1968 to the present.

12.2.8 Assess developments in foreign policy from 1968 to the end of the Cold War.

12.2.9 Describe the challenges facing the United States at home and abroad in the post-Cold War era.

 

12.5.13 Define public policy and identify examples at local, state and national levels.

12.5.14 Explain how citizens can monitor and influence the formation and implementation of public policies.

 

12.6 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs, including the divisions of the world into nations and interactions between the United States and other nations. The student should be able to

12.6.1 Explain how the world is organized politically into nations and states.

12.6.2 Describe the means that nation-states use to interact with one another.

12.6.3         Analyze how U.S. foreign policy is formulated and the means by which it is carried out.

12.6.4 Identify important current foreign policy issues and evaluate the means the United States is using to deal with them.

12.6.5 Explain the role of major international organizations in the world today.

 

12.13.3 Examine the use of government subsidies and taxes to influence the output of certain goods and services.

12.13.4 Compare the major sources of federal, state and local revenues.

12.13.5 Compare proportional, progressive and regressive taxes and explain justifications of each in past and current times.

12.13.6 Explain the functions of government regulations.

12.13.7 Define externalities and explain how the government deals with them.

12.13.8 Explain the role of government in income redistribution.

12.13.9 Define property rights and explain how government protects property rights.

12.13.10 Describe special interest groups and explain their economic objectives.

12.14 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the national economy and economic policies. The student should be able to

12.14.1 Define the following selected indicators of economic health: gross domestic product, unemployment, the consumer price index and personal disposable income.

 

 

 

Grades 11 12

United States and South Carolina Studies Government -- Economics

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/Political Science

III. People, Places and Environments: Geography

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

12.6.6 Describe the influence of American political ideas on other nations.

12.6.7 Describe the impact of other nations' political ideas on the United States.

12.6.8 Describe the impact of significant political, demographic, environmental and technological trends in the world.

 

12.7 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the role of the citizen in American democracy, including personal and civic rights and responsibilities. The student should be able to

12.7.1 Explain the important characteristics of citizenship in the United States.

12.7.2 Evaluate the criteria established by the naturalization laws.

12.7.3 Identify the major documentary sources of personal, political and economic rights.

12.7.4 Evaluate, take and defend positions on issues involving personal, political and economic rights.

12.7.5 Explain the meaning of political rights as distinguished from personal rights.

12.7.6 Explain why it may be necessary to limit personal rights and identify criteria that may be used to identify the circumstances under which such limitations may be justified.

 

 

12.14.2 Distinguish between nominal and real Gross Domestic Product.

12.14.3 Distinguish between potential and actual Gross Domestic Product.

12.14.4 Explain how increased or decreased spending impacts Gross Domestic Product.

12.14.5 Explain the basic circular flow of economic activity.

12.14.6 Compare frictional, cyclical and structural unemployment.

12.14.7 Explain who benefits and who suffers from inflation.

12.14.8 Define fiscal policy and identify examples of fiscal policy measures.

12.14.9 Explain the effects of expansive and contractionary fiscal policy.

12.14.10 Enumerate the various forms the money supply takes in the United States.

12.14.11 Explain how banks "create" money.

12.14.12      Explain the impact of interest rates, budgeting and savings and the use of loans and credit cards on individual financial decision-making.

12.14.13      Describe the structure and function of the Federal Reserve System.


Grades 11 12

United States and South Carolina Studies Government -- Economics

I. Time, Continuity and Change: History

 

II. Power, Authority and Governance: Government/Political Science

 

IV. Production, Distribution and Consumption: Economics

 

12.7.7 Evaluate the importance of commonly held personal responsibilities to life in a democracy.

12.7.8 Evaluate the importance of commonly held civic responsibilities to life in a democracy.

12.7.9 Identify examples of individual and public goals and explain how participation in civic and political life can help attain them.

12.7.10 Explain how Americans can monitor and influence politics and government at the local, state and national levels.

12.7.11Evaluate the importance of political leadership and public service in a constitutional democracy.

12.7.12 Explain why becoming knowledgeable about public affairs and the values and principles of American constitutional democracy and communicating that knowledge to others are important forms of participation.

12.7.13 Cite examples of how technology can be used to promote effective citizenship. (e.g., the role of technology in voting, obtaining information about candidates, governmental issues, etc.)

 

 

12.14.14 Define monetary policy.

12.14.15 Identify the major monetary policy measures available to the Federal Reserve System.

12.14.16 Explain how the banking system can affect the money supply and economic activity.

12.14.17 Explain the chain of consequences of expansive and contractionary monetary policy.

12.15 The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the principles of trade and economic development. The student should be able to

12.15.1 Analyze the concept "global economy."

12.15.2 Explain the balance of trade.

12.15.3 Identify problems facing developing nations.

12.15.4Identify problems facing developing nations.

12.15.5 Explain the fundamental principles of absolute and comparative advantage.

12.15.6 Describe the impact of a rise or fall in the American dollar relative to another nation's currency.

12.15.7 Describe barriers to international trade.

12.15.8 Define terms such as tariff, quota, exchange rate, the balance of payments, most favored nation trade status, etc.

 

 

* The standards are written for United States and South Carolina Studies from Reconstruction to Present. Individual districts may determine the scope of the courses.